2016 Sydney Rides

Seeing over 20 events in the 2016 Sydney Rides Festival brochure for much of October, my measly take-up doesn’t seem worthy? On the other hand, a lot aren’t so relevant for me: Ride to work? Cyclocross? Bike Polo? Hill climb? etc. Even the Chocolate Ride didn’t drag me in (yes, I couldn’t trust myself) & the timing or proximity for some didn’t fit.

Doing the Brompton Urban Challenge was probably the highlight & our pre-arranged team (Mrs Aussie & myself, along with “master navigator” Mark) was keen. Armed with our guidelines & clue sheet, we/Mark engineered a route around the city & inner surrounds to achieve our tasks over 4 hours or so before we were due at the presentation meet-up area. (team pic courtesy of another Mark?)The delights of getting around the city on mostly car-free routes on our Bromptons was the big reward from the Urban Challenge. (The fact that it was our only reward didn’t matter, honestly! Perhaps our pics lacked a tad craziness? (read “youthful exuberance”?) Maybe next year?) As with all Brompton gatherings, the socialising-time at the presentation area was all too short. The Brompton folding competition, the food trucks, the other bike happenings; all great entertainment. Thanks organisers, thanks participants.

The Sydney Suit Ride sounded quaint; the smartest riders in town, rolling through the city – & followed by a free lunch! As befitting a Ride in a suit, the pace was gentle & the territory was mostly hill-free. About 40 bikes attended, including 4 Bromptons, with quite a mix of commuting choices – & about one third e-bikes! The route was from Surry Hills through to Observatory Hill & return, mostly along cycle ways & paths. The only struggle was getting through all the bicycle traffic lights on the all-too-short greens? Such a shame that the priorities lay with keeping motorists happy, rather than allowing cyclists to flow along? Thanks to BicycleNSW for the great weather/organising/shepherding/food.

Attending the Spring Cycle Ride (along with 8000+ bikes sending their way from North Sydney via the Harbour Bridge to Olympic Park?) was always “a maybe” but while riding in the Olympic Park area a couple of days before, my mind was made up. The Ride preparations were underway, sign-posting to guide riders through the winding cycle paths & suddenly my enthusiasm was for a quiet ride with a sea breeze (& out of the hot part of the day?). Accordingly, we headed to the Northern Beaches & undertook our little “Narrabeen Lagoon loop & Deewhy gelato” adventure; much more relaxing?

My last Rides Festival event wasn’t even a ride, but a train trip to the city for a talk named, “How the Dutch do it” (well, shopping & a long lunch also got fitted in). Cycling in the Netherlands as described by a visiting Urban Planning Professor was quite enlightening. It seems that “Build it & they will come…” wasn’t how things happened, but more like “When systems don’t cope anymore, build it…” (& continue the cycle Ad infinitum?). Amongst the stats I recall figures such as “500,000 bike racks, 600,000 bike journeys” & some quite telling pics of overloaded parking stations? (you know the sort of thing; human nature with a full parking station leads to, “I’m late, that’ll do”?)

I can’t finish this blog post without thanking Ralph-e for such wonderful support for all these rides. I’m sure I can say, “I couldn’t have done it without you”? It’s difficult to express how brilliant my riding has become with this e-bike setup. For now I’m having to re-learn how to deal with hills while also comprehending the e-bike potential. Please keep watching.

Ralph-e learning

My new ebike world is progressing nicely. So far, rides on Ralph-e (a recent electric conversion of my Alfine 11-speed Brompton) have totaled about 200km along mostly coastal bike paths. Mrs Aussie has laboured somewhat while I basically cruised (the reverse of our previous ride efforts for some years?). I coped with savage headwinds & stiff hills without much concern, although a certain amount of guilt nags away (for a while?).

My technicalities recipe is to take one Brompton, add a 250watt Crystalyte motor to the front wheel & mount a 20amp GrinTech controller above the rear of the front mudguard…
Fit a TDCM torque sensing bottom bracket, with a hole drilled in the bottom of the frame for the cable connection…
Mount a GrinTech Cycle Analyst computer to the handlebars & join everything together with a wiring loom…
…and finally, include a battery (in my case, an eZee Lithium-manganese 36volt 15AmpHour, i.e. 540WattHours) within a Brompton bag at the front…
The whole experience has been an illuminating & exciting learning curve, from the ride characteristics (sounds, power-off lag (especially on slow-speed maneuvers) & smooth power) to the technical data available from the computer system (up to 11 displays for ride, motor power, human power & energy data). Choosing to “go electric” was a concern for an appropriate ride experience (brilliantly answered?), a quality product (very satisfied, even considering the likelihood of an eventual Brompton ebike release?) & a deciphering of all manner of ebike jargon & implications (eg cost, weight, power & range?).

The info & stats from the computer display has provided insights & understanding for my ebike adventure. Rather than the experience of observing a series of lights representing battery level or power levels, while riding I can see the exact consumption from the battery (amphours), my output level (human watts), economy (watthours consumed from the battery per km ridden), the usual bike computer data – & other stuff I’m still getting my head around. However, determining the all-important battery range is still a work-in-progress while my economy level has been improving with re-configuring & fine-tuning for power output. So far, a range exceeding 100kms (depending on the demands of the ride?) is on the cards – although probably not on my agenda?

Brompton weight was something I could estimate pretty accurately (about 4kg?) before the conversion although battery weight was an unknown while I was unsure what battery size to use. The 540Wh unit I decided on is great for range but adds another 4kg in weight. As usual, front luggage weight on a Brompton has virtually no affect on ride handling. I’m becoming quite proficient at folding Ralph-e with the front bag in place & the folded handling has been helped with the inclusion of a rear rack.

The final word on my Brompton ebike experience to date: priceless!

Introducing Ralph-e…

i.e. “Ralph” (my Brompton Alfine 11speed) plus a Grin Technologies Brompton conversion kit equals “Ralph-e”

My previous blog post on “Electric patience” mentioned a coming electric conversion of one of my Bromptons, rather than wait out the eventual (?) release of a factory electric Brompton. What I’ve now got from Glow Worm Bicycles (thanks Ali, Maurice, Tim, Manny, et al) is possibly my ideal setup: a Pedelec Brompton, requiring that I still have to pedal everywhere but providing electric motor assistance for hills, etc.

Ralph-e has a torque sensor bottom bracket (& no throttle control), a comprehensive computer display & a whopper battery. There, that’s my technical info nicely simplified – until a future post? (Oh, & the setup is capable of regenerative braking if I add the e-brake levers but for now I’m unsure if I’ll bother.)

So far my little solo test riding has shown an enhancement to my “Brompton Grin” & I’m quite hopeful of comfortably keeping up with Mrs Aussie? We’ll see.

Electric patience

I’m trying to be patient & any day/week now there should be a call? My patience for the electric Brompton has been frustrating, with so many rumours & release expectations. It’s been a constant for many years, as has my need for low geared bikes to provide assistance for riding with a heart condition. I can choose between six-speed Bromptons with 40T cranksets or an Alfine 11-speed with 44T but under some riding conditions I’m still struggling at walking pace. So the desire for a Pedelec Brompton (one that I still have to pedal to get electric motor assistance, rather than just push/twist a throttle) has been a hope for “normal cycling”. Will the electric Brompton dream eventuate?

Recent news from Brompton on a likely introduction is the latest release info, but wasn’t very encouraging from my point of view. The Brompton announcement (http://www.brompton.com/News/Posts/2016/Electric-bike/) has expressed the release as “selected European cities in Summer 2017” (i.e. maybe July 2017?) but who knows when for the global market?

Armed with some “UK-trip scuttlebut” & fresh research, I decided to check out local offerings for the possibility of a Brompton conversion. My initial findings weren’t very encouraging for obtaining a satisfactory product – but then I visited a shop where their conversions matched my quality & engineering expectations. At present I’m not going to mention the business name owing to various reasons – & Brompton restrictions? – but suffice to say they now have one of my Bromptons for conversion.

Progress has been slower than I’d like due to workloads & component supply but really, everything is bearable in comparison to the alternatives? The conversion components are from Grin Technologies, a Canadian company that offers a Brompton kit (http://www.ebikes.ca/product-info/brompton-kit.html/) with various options; my choices to be revealed once my Brompton is completed. Fingers crossed for that call soon?

BWC Final 2016

After 6 weeks touring the UK & Northern Ireland, we’d arrived for “the big event”: the 2016 Brompton World Championship Final in London. Unlike our 2013 experience riding the BWC at Goodwood Motor Racing circuit, this year it was part of the RideLondon cycling events – & Mrs Aussie had won a place in the race ballot!

No problems coping with race registration & much “meeting & greeting”, with lots of time to admire/gawk at some fantastic race outfits. Heading for the circuit Mrs Aussie was all smiles.

On the grid & before the Le Mans start, there was some “Keep calm & Brompt On” time – & probably that rehearsal, “Handlebars up, raise the seat…”?

500+ Bromptons whizzing around the race track make for some serious racing but the “Brompton grin” was often evident – for brief periods?

The post-race activities were a blur & all too short (what with re-fueling, Gin & tonics, celebrations, awards, etc) before Brompton closed the hospitality area & we pedaled away – until next time?

Family cruise

Early this year we took our first cruise; 14 days from Sydney, taking in Melbourne, Hobart, Milford Sound, Dunedin, Akaroa, Wellington, Picton, Napier, Tauranga & finishing in Auckland. After another 7 days in & around Auckland we then flew back to Sydney. The whole trip went well; lovely weather (& sea conditions?) until the last few days near Auckland. Clarence & Peregrine came along for the experience & it was an interesting time; a good test for another time?

Our usual airline luggage setup is a bike bag, containing a Brompton, clothing, etc (1 checked bag) & a backpack/cabin bag. I’m rather cautious in preparing the Brompton to suit luggage handling methods.

We settled in to our verandah stateroom on Holland America Line’s Noordam (spot the 2 Bromptons?). Whenever out on the verandah, the thought existed of being locked out & having to say those words, “HAL, open the cabin door please”?

The big question for us was taking the Bromptons ashore? How easy? What issues? We could probably have managed it on all stops but in fact we only did it 3 times mid-cruise. The onboard portion was easy; unfold in the cabin & wheel it to whichever deck was being used for the gangway. Aside from ports where we had particular non-biking activities planned, 2 issues presented themselves. One was the use of a tender at Akaroa; rather crowded on the early departures but I’m sure it would have been possible? The unexpected issue was a number of ports that used an industrial berthing location (passenger facility wharves being too small?) & going ashore involved being bussed off the wharf. Another factor to consider was the distance the Brompton had to be wheeled before a ride could commence; port officials weren’t happy with riding within “their space”. In Melbourne we mostly cruised around the bay, with great weather that lasted all the way to Auckland.

After a calm Bass Strait (wow!?) & a smooth Tasman Sea crossing, we had a pre-dawn arrival into a calm Milford Sound (with the old hands not believing their good fortune?)

After the Sounds we “turned the corner” & headed up the East coast. The first of our industrial wharf berthings, Port Chalmers was our gateway to Dunedin, the Edinburgh of the South? Free WiFi in a marque on the wharf was very popular, although lethargic, but once in the centre of Dunedin the council-provided “GigCity” was probably the fastest WiFi in the whole of NZ? (Well, I didn’t encounter anything faster!) Our return to the ship was farewelled by a Scottish band, nestled amongst a common port sight; containers & logs galore!

A few favourite regular evening happenings onboard were our pre-dinner “preparations”, post-dinner relaxing with this Polish duo’s classical music & checking out what the bed-turndown display would be (every evening featured a different creature).

Only one visit required tenders for landing. Maybe a dozen tenders shuttled us ashore at Akaroa, the replacement for the earthquake-devastated port near Chistchurch. Nice calm seas with an anchorage inside an ancient volcano caldera?

Another berthing was to 1930s earthquake-devastated Napier, with its Art Deco buildings still sparkling long after the city rebuilding.

Spotted this junior bike track during our Brompton cruise around Napier; a mock road environment for teaching road skills (& reminding me of my own learning experiences in my Auckland Primary school grounds when Police officers would bring along portable traffic lights, other street furniture, pedal cars, trikes & scooters).

NZ being renowned for its earthquake activity, this Tsunami warning sign wasn’t too alarming? (funny though, having grown up in NZ & then visited many times, my only earthquake experience to-date has actually been in Sydney!)

Once off the Noordam in Auckland we played “tourist in a rental car” but still had a few Bromptings; this one on the North Shore (pic looking back to the Harbour Bridge).

Finally, all the sunny weather disappeared over the last few days of the trip. Rain & big winds on the coast had its own attractions – but not too appealing for the new owner of this catamaran damaged & blown ashore?

Distracted somewhat

Yes we did return from that cruise & the Bromptons have been in action but blogging hasn’t been top priority for the last four months. You see, I’ve been somewhat distracted with the lawn bowling Pennants season & this weekend was to be the culmination, with playoffs to decide the Zone winner for progression to the State Finals in late July. The season has gone really well; trial matches & then an unbeaten run to be top point-scorer for an automatic place in the final. As you may make out in the pic, our Pennant Hills team won our section & the semifinal would be between Burwood Diggers & Wenty Leagues. Woohoo, perhaps repeating our Pennants flag win of last year?
However, particularly nasty weather this whole weekend (see the blue spot for our location in the pic) has seen all attempts to play the games defeated & the next scheduled date in the calendar is a few weeks away.

“Who left the wheelbarrow out?”

Unfortunately, I shall be away when the rescheduled playoffs take place! Fortunately, Mrs Aussie has been doing lots of planning & very soon now we’ll depart on our BWC sojourn! Lots of packing/preparing to do… (& catching up on the blogs?)