Ralph-e learning

My new ebike world is progressing nicely. So far, rides on Ralph-e (a recent electric conversion of my Alfine 11-speed Brompton) have totaled about 200km along mostly coastal bike paths. Mrs Aussie has laboured somewhat while I basically cruised (the reverse of our previous ride efforts for some years?). I coped with savage headwinds & stiff hills without much concern, although a certain amount of guilt nags away (for a while?).

My technicalities recipe is to take one Brompton, add a 250watt Crystalyte motor to the front wheel & mount a 20amp GrinTech controller above the rear of the front mudguard…
Fit a TDCM torque sensing bottom bracket, with a hole drilled in the bottom of the frame for the cable connection…
Mount a GrinTech Cycle Analyst computer to the handlebars & join everything together with a wiring loom…
…and finally, include a battery (in my case, an eZee Lithium-manganese 36volt 15AmpHour, i.e. 540WattHours) within a Brompton bag at the front…
The whole experience has been an illuminating & exciting learning curve, from the ride characteristics (sounds, power-off lag (especially on slow-speed maneuvers) & smooth power) to the technical data available from the computer system (up to 11 displays for ride, motor power, human power & energy data). Choosing to “go electric” was a concern for an appropriate ride experience (brilliantly answered?), a quality product (very satisfied, even considering the likelihood of an eventual Brompton ebike release?) & a deciphering of all manner of ebike jargon & implications (eg cost, weight, power & range?).

The info & stats from the computer display has provided insights & understanding for my ebike adventure. Rather than the experience of observing a series of lights representing battery level or power levels, while riding I can see the exact consumption from the battery (amphours), my output level (human watts), economy (watthours consumed from the battery per km ridden), the usual bike computer data – & other stuff I’m still getting my head around. However, determining the all-important battery range is still a work-in-progress while my economy level has been improving with re-configuring & fine-tuning for power output. So far, a range exceeding 100kms (depending on the demands of the ride?) is on the cards – although probably not on my agenda?

Brompton weight was something I could estimate pretty accurately (about 4kg?) before the conversion although battery weight was an unknown while I was unsure what battery size to use. The 540Wh unit I decided on is great for range but adds another 4kg in weight. As usual, front luggage weight on a Brompton has virtually no affect on ride handling. I’m becoming quite proficient at folding Ralph-e with the front bag in place & the folded handling has been helped with the inclusion of a rear rack.

The final word on my Brompton ebike experience to date: priceless!

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4 thoughts on “Ralph-e learning

  1. tassiedi 25/10/2016 at 06:24 Reply

    Thanks for sharing the technical stuff and your experience, Ian.

  2. Nate Miller 30/10/2016 at 00:51 Reply

    My wife’s Brompton is an e-Brompton as well (from NYCEwheels) What is that mounted behind the front wheel, some sort of power controller? I’m assuming its the equivalent of the big black piece that goes on the stem on the NYCeWheels e-Brompton.

    • Aussie on a Brompton 30/10/2016 at 10:02 Reply

      Thanks for the comment Nate. Yes, the electronics controller is mounted behind the front wheel, whereas NYCE seem to have mounted their version on the stem. As with all of these things, “what will Brompton do?”

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